Joan Mitchell

Another artist I came across during my visit to The Tate Modern was Joan Mitchell. I had never heard of her before. This is not the painting in the Tate collection but one was particularly drawn to while researching her. I enjoy the playful, lyrical loseness of the brushstrokes, the horizontal format and the joyful use of colour in her work.

Minnesota, 1980 Oil on canvas (four panels)
102 1/2 x 243 inches (260.4 x 617.2 cm)
Collection of the Joan Mitchell Foundation, New York.

Joan Mitchell Foundation » Minnesota. This link is to the Joan Mitchel Foundation which has proved an excellent starting point to find out about her life and inspiration.

Here are some extracts from the introduction.

“My paintings repeat a feeling about Lake Michigan, or water, or fields…it’s more like a poem…and that’s what I want to paint.” The myriad things that comprised and moved within Mitchell’s world – water, sky, trees, flowers, weather, dogs – created images and memories from which she worked.

She observed her landscape intensely, and her acute visual observations of form, space and color in life are part of the visual memories she drew upon while painting.

Her paintings were built slowly and carefully; she would stand back and look at a blank canvas or painting in progress for long periods of time, decide where each mark should go, then approach the work to place paint quickly and confidently.

Mitchell’s process is informed by a range of emotional states, points in time, and positions in landscape, and her work is an affirmation that people experience landscapes, emotions and memories in a complex, interconnected way.

“What excites me when I’m painting is what one color does to another and what they do to each other in terms of space and interaction.”

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About Annemarie Tickle

I am a Lecturer in Textilesat Hull School of Art and Design. As a visual artist I am interested in interpeting sublime aspects of the landscape through manipulation of fabric and expressive use of dying techniques.
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